2D to 3D 2 on me

2D to 3D 2 on me

I wrote a post a while back about starting work on a costume from a video game. When I wrote that I posted a picture of the character and had been very pleased at the fabric I had selected. The next thing was to make the costume. Enlisting the help of Lady Jen for the skirt we managed to get it all done inside of two sewing sessions.

In the past while never a fabric based costume (I tend to work in foam) I do have experience working off of video games and cartoons. Projects like this tend not to have a set pattern, these articles of clothing are right from someone’s mind to the page. The other problem is that they have been drawn/painted/digitized on. The body in the outfit was drawn to wear it.

Alright this is the part where I link this all back to something historical.

While many folks who work on regency garments work from patterns – some like to work off of fashion plates, paintings or perhaps just can’t find a pattern that works. After working off many 2D images I have a few thoughts for anyone looking to work off a flat picture.

1) Draw out the outfit. No matter even if you are just someone who doodles. This will help you work out the flow and feel that the artist was going for.

2) Take a picture with you when you go for fabric and be willing to compromise. Sometimes the fabric in your 2D doesn’t exist.

3) See if you have a pattern that is close enough and work out way early what you will have to mod. With regency outfit you should be able to make this work. For us with the skirt we mashed a skirt patten and a petticoat pattern together, but made note of fabric we would need for the pleats. You may even want to make a mock up out of cheeper fabric. Please note that this is by no means how you draft a pattern but if you are open to experimenting has worked for me in the past.

4) Pick a spot on you that will be your point of reference. As I said before the person you are taking inspiration from was drawn to wear that outfit. Artist wanted the skirt longer maybe they just drew longer legs. More detail in the bust area, it’s not a problem if they make the torso a bit bigger. While the figure you are looking at may not seem out of proportion when you get that outfit on you it may look all kinds of wrong. The way I have always dealt with this is by picking a spot where what I am looking at will 100% sit in the right place on me. With me I always pick my waist.

5) Ask for help and rip it out. With something like this the best thing you can do it have a second set of eyes. Even if it is as simple of having them look at you in your mock up and saying if it looks alright. Note as well if something looks odd not just to you but them as well, get ready to rip out and try again.

For those of you who are wondering I have added a pic of me in the final outfit below. Character image I used was mostly the one I put up a few post back. However I also used game play footage to get a feel of movement and flow.

On my way to the Con!

On my way to the Con!

Have you ever worked from a 2D image? If you did what would you make?

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The Long and the Short of it

So sometimes as we all know Real Life can take over and you can not seem to have a moment to get a breath. Most of August was like that for me as things picked up very fast at work. However I have been able to take some time off and have been re-charging. Also there have been a few odds and ends I have needed to take care of, one of them is a very much needed hair cut.

I have always been a bit funny about my hair. It was never something I learned to do anything with. Attempts were made off and on in middle school to very very little success. In high school I was involved with theater and hair was something you handed over to someone else. For the most part I have kept my hair a little longer then shoulder length. Though by the end of this summer it had grown midway down my back. This was as Lady Jen pointed out, a wonderful thing, as it would give me more then enough hair to put up for Balls and 1812 events. Over the past year it has done me very well for these types of outings. I even managed to learn how to pull it back into a bun! Over the summer I think I looked up more pictures of Regency hair then anything else. All of them for long hair many of them with steps on how to achieve the look. Booked marked and filed away for events in the fall.

It did however hit a point that as lovely as it was for events, it was getting to long. The final straw came when one night when this long mane was fanned out over the bed. His Lordship asleep rolled over on to it…then I rolled over. Needless to say it woke me up and I knew something had to be done. So on the first day I had off I drove over to the salon and had counted on getting a trim. Despite talking a big game about going short I had a very strong feeling that it would be nothing more then a trim, after all I still had all those events this fall.

For what ever reason as I sat down I told her to cut it short. In fact it it now the shortest I have ever had it. In side of 45 minutes it went from down my back to about an inch above my shirt collar. Happy and much lighter I set out to grab a coffee. Feeling great until I gave a bit of thought to all the Regency events coming up. As it stands right now I can barely get it pulled back let alone get it in a bun. Not a huge fan of dancing in a turban. What is a Lady to do?

I have been looking at pictures of Lady Caroline Lamb. Many of us know that she is the post girl for short hair during this time. After looking at pictures of her what I can’t work out is just how short her hair was un-curled. Could I just curl it all and push it forward? As for historic ways to do this is there a difference with paper curls vs rag curls other then the maternal used? Dose it even matter and should I just suck it up and turban it all?

So readers I ask you if you have any tips tricks or thoughts on this. I have a little under a month until the next big event and hope that it’s not a hair raising one.